Focus on Leadership: Timekeeping

There was an interesting article that came across social media a couple months ago, Timekeeping as Feminist Pedagogy. Now, that kind of academic title might have you running for the hills, but the piece is actually an easy and enlightening read. The title caught the eye as we have been exploring the practices that help us be better leaders in our ministries, and sticking to one’s agenda was high on that list.

This article was helpful in framing that conversation in that it is not only about respecting each other’s time in general by starting meetings on time and keeping meetings to the agreed-upon timeframe. It goes further by insisting that we carefully measure the time given to different voices in the room. If you have set aside 5 minutes for a presentation, letting it go over time decreases the time others have for their reports and presentations, for discussion and counterpoints.

This fits well within our Presbyterian context where we use what some see as an arcane system of organizing meetings and decision-making, Robert’s Rules of Order. Some see it as an adherence to tradition for tradition’s sake, and that there are other ways of making decisions that might better fit our modern times. That may be true, but whenever we consider how we make decisions together, one of the most important pieces is to consider how to protect voices of dissent.

We have to consider how to give enough time and power for the voices of those who may be on the minority side of an issue to be heard and considered. We do not know how the Holy Spirit may work through voices of dissent, and we have seen how valuing these voices has benefitted all of us. Hearing implications of our decisions we may not have considered can help us make better decisions and plans. Or, we may hear something that causes a sea change in the room – what seemed like a slam dunk is voted down entirely.

Presbyterians have found that providing adequate time and space to listen to one another helps us grow together better. It encourages courageous disagreement that may prevent us from a poor decision. And it engages all of our leaders in the conversation.

The author of the timekeeping article provides excellent examples of practices that can be implemented in meetings as well as the classroom. At the very least, we should regularly take some time to think about whose voices dominate our conversations and how we might engage every voice more fully in those conversations. Making sure we do not take up someone else’s time is definitely part of that.