Focus on Leadership: With a Little Help from My Friends

In the Presbyterian Church (USA), we talk a lot about being a “connectional church” or a “connectional denomination.” We don’t always talk about what that means, but if we are purely technical, it means that individual congregations are not the end of the line.

We gather together in regional bodies, such as presbyteries and synods, to discuss common mission, to work together to achieve that mission, and to help one another. We do the same at the national level through our General Assembly and Presbyterian Mission Agency. We believe that we are better at fulfilling our call to follow Christ together than apart.

We see this at work in our Global Mission, our Office of Public Witness, our Special Offerings that support particular needs that are better met with combined support, our Compassion, Peace and Justice programs, including everything from world hunger to environmental ministries to disaster response, and so much more.

We can see the results of our combined efforts in reports and pictures from these different offices throughout the year. And some of us receive an even deeper connection to this collective work, such as if your church or community has gone through a natural or human-caused disaster that Presbyterian Disaster Assistance has responded to. We have seen the very real ways our collective support meets real individual needs.

But even more than that is knowing that we are not in this alone. No pastor, no session, no elder on or off session, no staff person, no member, no visitor – none of us are in this alone. In fact, when we try to do everything on our own, whether a pastor, a volunteer, a staff person, a committee, or a whole church, try to do it alone, no matter how well-intentioned, it tends to backfire. Even if it is the mere blessing of a group for an individual to make a decision, that connection and input helps us follow Christ more faithfully.

There is a reason that Jesus called 10 disciples, and sent them out to minister in pairs, that even back in the beginning, God did not create merely one person, but a family. We are better together.

This is also a comfort. I may trust my instincts and expertise, but being able to talk to others I can trust – a pastor, a ruling elder, a presbytery staff person, an administer, another member – can help me check my instincts and thinking to see if they are driven by selfishness and/or ego, or out of a faithful witness. Sometimes I may be on the right path, but for the wrong reasons, or I am alienating partners, or I need to go forward in a slightly different way. Talking with others with a different perspective can help clarify the right way forward, and give me confidence in my next steps.

If I make decisions without including the voices of others in my thinking, even if it turns out to be the right thing, I can feel like I am constantly out on a ledge, not knowing how deep the canyon is. With others with me, even if we are taking risks, we can better assess those risks, and make a good plan together, bearing the results together as well.

We do not engage in this connectional church because we do not trust each other, but instead because we share a deep love and trust. We know that we can count on each other to give wise counsel, or to fail together, to laugh and grieve together, to see miracles happening through our faithful work together.

So, friends, don’t go it alone. If you don’t have good partners in ministry, go find them. Seek out trusted members of your congregation, and in other congregations. Look for the gifts in others that may not be your strengths. Respond to requests for help when you can. We are better together, and through us God can do anything.